High Street / Castle Hill Cottage – Then & Now

High St Thatched Cottage
Cottage at the junction of Malthouse Lane, with High Street in the distance and Castle Hill behind the camera

A timber framed cottage at the junction of Malthouse Lane, with High Street in the distance and Castle Hill behind the camera.

As Rob Steward explains in Kenilworth History 2001 – 2002, this cottage is “…probably early 17th century and of ‘cruck’ construction. Cruck construction consists of two purpose-grown curved tree branches cut longways down the middle and then the two halves placed together to form an ‘A’ frame and a cross beam fixed at ground floor ceiling level. Two frames are made, one for each of the gables, with a ridge beam joining the two apexes. They were ‘purpose-grown’ many years before, with future generations in mind, especially for the ribs in shipbuilding. Very often these ‘crucks’ were second-hand from old ships”.

Very little has changed between the 1960s and 2015 scene except the model of car parked beyond the cottage and the appearance of double yellow lines.

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Malthouse Lane – Then & Now

Malthouse Lane
Malthouse Lane

Malthouse Lane, which was known as Quarry Lane at the time of the 1861 census and then Malthouse Lane by 1874. To the extreme right of the image, behind the Malthouse, now lies the 1960s development including Amherst Road and Berkeley Road, on which lies two wooded hollows which were formerly quarries used during the building of Kenilworth Abbey in the mid-12th century. In the fields to the left of Malthouse Lane now lies De Montfort Road and Grange Avenue, on a site formerly occupied by the castle nurseries.

In the distance, Quarry Cottage at the far end of the lane is sited within a square trough which was once yet another quarry. The modern Quarry Road takes its name from its proximity to this.

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